Violin Concerto No. 3 in G Major

Violin Concerto No. 3 in G Major

Violin Concerto No. 3 in G Major

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Barnabás Kelemen's masterclass

Produced by the Saline royale Academy English Music sheet annotated by  Barnabás  Kelemen  is available 46 min Violin

Professor Barnabás Kelemen and his student Ekaterina Zeynetdinova work on bowing techniques, musical direction, and more.

Produced by the Saline royale Academy

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The masterclass

About this masterclass 

In this masterclass, Barnabás Kelemen discusses precision, bowing, and phrasing in the first movement of Mozart’s G Major Violin Concerto. He first works with the student on her bow arm, helping her release tension in her hand so that the bow can be more free. He encourages her to feel a “pulling” motion with the bow rather than a tense “pushing” movement. Using this bow technique, he also helps her develop a more continuous sound that is not punctuated by unwanted accents from bowing. They work to develop long lines, even when the music is articulated, that have a clear direction.

Furthermore, the performer should always have a goal in mind for each phrase. Kelemen also discusses tempo and rhythmic precision. Whatever tempo she chooses, she must make sure to maintain it throughout the work and be careful not to trail behind, especially on long or tied notes, so that the orchestra or piano can consistently follow her. 

What we learn in this masterclass 

  1. Freeing the bow hand.

  2. “Pulling” the bow rather than “pushing” it.

  3. Maintaining tempo and precision of timing.

  4. Having direction in the phrase.

  5. Continuing the sound even through articulation.

Violin Concerto No. 3 in G Major, K 216 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Composed in Salzburg in 1775, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 3 in G Major, 1st movement is scored for solo violin, strings, two oboes, and two horns in G and D. The first movement Allegro is followed by an Adagio (includes two flutes) and a Rondeau: Allegro.  

The first movement is in classic sonata form and very operatic in character. It opens with the orchestra that plays a theme in G major that is bright and jovial. The solo violin and orchestra develop a dialog with one another that is happy and light. This is followed by a modulation to the dominant D major, which shifts to D Minor. After moving to other keys, the piece leads back to the tonic in the recapitulation.  

  • Date:08 April 2022
  • Producer: Produced by the Saline royale Academy
  • Duration:46 min
  • Spoken language:English

Sheet music

Aim for excellence! You can improve your skills with expert advice. Download the annotated sheet music of this violin masterclass. Please note that this piece has been annotated in accordance to Barnabás Kelemen’s feedback and comments.

Sheet music violin concerto no. 3 in g major

Barnabás Kelemen

Barnabás  Kelemen

He won first prize at the Salzburg International Mozart Violin Competition in 1999 and at the Indianapolis International Violin Competition in 2002.

Barnabás Kelemen has performed at some of the most famous concert halls in the world with his virtuoso technique and dynamic, passionate playing style. Versatile and open-minded, he is an outstanding soloist and chamber musician, as well as an Artistic Director of various festivals, and a teacher at renowned institutions. In recent years, he has also worked professionally as a conductor. 

His repertoire is very diverse, including works from early Baroque, Classical, Romantic works, as well as pieces from the twentieth century. Additionally, he is a devoted advocate of contemporary music.

He regularly performs at the world’s most prominent concert venues, including Carnegie Hall, the Concertgebouw, the Royal Festival Hall, the Palais de Beaux Arts, Suntory Hall, and the Berliner Philharmonie. He is a frequent guest of such eminent ensembles as the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the Budapest Festival Orchestra, the Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra, the London Symphony Orchestra, the Estonian National Philharmonic Orchestra, the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, and Hannover’s NDR Radiophilharmonie, to name but a few. 

Barnabás Kelemen has worked with conductors such as Lorin Maazel, Sir Neville Marriner, Vladimir Jurowski, Marek Janowski, Michael Stern, Krzysztof Urbanski, Zoltán Kocsis, Péter Eötvös, and Iván Fischer. He is also an avid conductor himself – in recent seasons he has directed the Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, the Israeli Chamber Ensemble, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw Chamber Orchestra, and the symphonic orchestras of the Hungarian cities of Szombathely, Győr, and Pécs. On top of all this, he is a sensitive and experienced chamber musician who has played with artists of the calibre of Dezső Ránki, Steven Isserlis, Miklós Perényi, Alina Ibragimova, Vilde Frang, José Gallardo, and Andreas Ottensamer. 

Together with Katalin Kokas, he is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Festival Academy Budapest Chamber Music Festival, which regularly features artists such as Vilde Frang, Maxim Rysanov, Shlomo Mintz, and Joshua Bell. 

 

Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was a great child prodigy of Western music and one of the most important musicians of Classicism. He wrote more than six hundred compositions and single-handedly developed and popularized the piano concerto. He was widely recognized during his lifetime, and is still regarded as the most universal composer in the history of classical music.

Born in 1756 to Anna Maria and Leopold Mozart in Salzburg, Austria, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s musical talents were recognized at an early age. By age four, the young prodigy began playing the harpsichord, and by five-years old he was composing pieces. The  Mozart family would make several trips throughout Europe to exhibit the young boy and his sister’s sensational virtuosity with the harpsichord and violin.

In later years, Mozart would enjoy a flourishing career in Vienna. He frequently performed as a pianist and was regarded as the most outstanding keyboard player in the city. In addition to his career as a performer, Mozart established himself as a fine composer. In 1782, he wrote the opera Die Entführung aus dem Serail, which was very successful. Other renowned operas written by the rising composer included Le Nozze de Figaro (1786), Don Giovanni (1787), and Cósi fan Tutte (1790).

The death of his father in 1787 may have marked the decline of Mozart’s career. He composed very few works, suffered many financial problems, and in 1791 during a visit in Prague for the premier  of his opera  La clemenza di Tito, Mozart became very ill. In his final days, Mozart was preoccupied with completing his final oeuvre : Requiem in D Minor, K. 626. Unfortunately, he was unable to complete this piece (it was later finished by his student Franz Xaver Süssmayr) as he passed away on December 5th, 1791 possibly of rheumatic fever, however the official cause is unknown.

Despite Mozart’s tragic early demise, the brilliant instrumentalist and composer left an unparalleled legacy. He was a gifted composer all around and wrote in every major genre including but not limited to symphonies, operas, solo concertos, sonatas, masses and more. His influence is wide and profound, and his music continues to be recognized and celebrated for its ingenuity.

 

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