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Dalberto Michel, Ravel, Valses nobles et sentimentales

Sequence published on 12/2/21
Composer : Maurice Ravel
Year of composition : 1911
Artistic period : 20th century
Academy : Academy Oct 25 - Nov 1, 2020
Master(s) : Michel Dalberto
Student : Kennosuke Izuka
Instrument(s) played :

"Just let the music speak, don't add anything" Michel Dalberto

About the Piano class of Maurice Ravel's work on the Valses nobles et sentimentales

Master class de Piano, Maurice Ravel | Valses nobles et sentimentales

"Michel Dalberto listens to the pianist play a set of pieces by Maurice Ravel, ""Les Valses Nobles et Sentimentales."" The master begins by explaining that this piece is a set of eight waltzes which Maurice Ravel composed in 1911. Then, on the day of the premiere, the public was asked who they thought the composer was, but the question stumped everyone.
Later, the master emphasizes that the most important beat on the waltz is the first, which is important for the performance. Dalberto also highlights the significance of the Viennese waltz.
"

Later, the master and the student work on the use of the pedal, some dynamics, breaths, and some issues related to tempo.

What we learn in this Piano Master class

-The waltz, in the rhythm, the first and most important beat is the first one
-The importance of breathing

About Maurice Ravel work

"The inspiration for Maurice Ravel’s Valses Nobles et Sentimentales came from two groups of piano pieces Franz Schubert had penned more than 80 years before: the 12 Valses nobles (D.969, published in 1827 as Schubert’s Op. 77) and the 34 Valses sentimentales (D.779, from 1823–24). In both cases the titles were probably invented by the publishers rather than having been suggested by Franz Schubert himself. Nonetheless, they do sum up the spirit of the respective groups of waltzes, which have been cherished through the years more as “private” amusements for the studio or salon than as items for the concert stage. The inspiration for Maurice Ravel’s Valses Nobles et Sentimentales came from two groups of piano pieces that Franz Schubert had penned more than 80 years before: the 12 Valses Nobles (D.969, published in 1827 as Schubert’s Op. 77) and the 34 Valses Sentimentales (D.779, from 1823–24). In both cases, the titles were probably invented by the publishers rather than having been suggested by Franz Schubert himself. Nevertheless, they do sum up the spirit of the respective groups of waltzes, which have been cherished through the years more as “private” amusements for the studio or salon, rather than as items for the concert stage. Valses Nobles et Sentimentales stands as a seminal work in Maurice Ravel’s oeuvre, a pure distillation of his harmonic practices and his distinctive expression. The work’s lilting rhythms and sharp dissonances seem transparent, yet the simplicity is deceptive. This is the piece that moved Claude Debussy to declare of Maurice Ravel, ""This is the most subtle ear that can ever have existed."" "
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