Cello Suite No. 5 in C Minor, 1st movement

Cello Suite No. 5 in C Minor, 1st movement

Cello Suite No. 5 in C Minor, 1st movement

Johann Sebastian Bach

Marc Coppey's masterclass

Produced by the Saline royale Academy English Music sheet annotated by  Marc  Coppey  is available 52 min Cello

Marc Coppey and Eliott Leridon work on intonation, color and more in this cello masterclass.

Produced by the Saline royale Academy

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The masterclass

About this masterclass

In this masterclass, Marc Coppey reviews the unique elements of Bach’s fifth cello suite and how performers can use this knowledge to inform their musical decisions. He works with student Eliott Leridon to achieve more ease in string crossings and shifts without stiffness in the bow. He also discusses the importance of harmony, both in bringing out the different voices as well as playing with perfect intonation within the chords to achieve the right color.

Overall, Coppey encourages the student to breathe with the music so that the music can breathe as well. Though having a sense of pulse is always important, the student can be more flexible and take time on expressive intervals and other meaningful musical moments. 

What we learn in this masterclass

  1. Bringing out the French aspects of this suite.

  2. Feeling the tension-release in the harmony.

  3. Intonation and color within chords.

  4. Stretching time for harmony, appoggiatura, and intervals. 

  5. Changing strings with ease.

Cello Suite No. 5 in C Minor by Johann Sebastian Bach

Bach composed his six suites for unaccompanied cello, known for their challenging musical interpretations and technical demands, in Cöthen between 1717-23. Unlike the others, the fifth suite was composed in scordatura, meaning that the A string was tuned down a step to G (although modern scores contain versions written for the standard cello). Both this tuning system and the key of C minor contribute to the suite's darker tone. The suite is also unique because although its form remains in the standard six Baroque dance movements, the prelude, courante, and gigue are in the French style rather than the typical Italian. The French character is further emphasized by the prevalence of dotted rhythms throughout the work. The suite is best known for its stark and melancholic sarabande, which unusually does not contain any double stops or chords.

  • Composer: Bach
  • Piece:Cello Suite No. 5 in C Minor, 1st movement
  • Professor: Marc Coppey
  • Student:Eliott Leridon
  • Instruments: Cello
  • Date:29 October 2021
  • Producer: Produced by the Saline royale Academy
  • Duration:52 min
  • Spoken language:English

Sheet music

Aim for excellence! You can improve your skills with expert advice. Download the annotated sheet music of this cello masterclass. Please note that this piece has been annotated in accordance to Marc Coppey’s feedback and comments.

Sheet music cello suite no. 5 in c minor, 1st movement

Marc Coppey

Marc  Coppey

In 1988 won the two highest prizes of the International Johann Sebastian Bach Competition: the first prize and the special prize for best Bach performance.

Marc Coppey is a critically acclaimed musician and is considered to be one of today’s leading cellists worldwide. Originally from Strasbourg, France, Coppey began his musical training at the Strasbourg Conservatory before attending the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris and the University of Indiana Bloomington. In 1988 at only 18-years-old, Coppey won first prize and special prize for best Bach performance at the International Johann Sebastian Bach Competition in Leipzig, Germany. Since then, Marc Coppey has regularly performed as a soloist with leading orchestras in collaboration with numerous distinguished conductors. Such conductors include but are not limited to: Eliahu Inbal, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Yan-Pascal Tortelier, Emmanuel Krivine, Alan Gilbert, and many more. He appears regularly in some of the most prestigious concert halls across Europe, North and South America, and Asia. In addition to his solo concert career, Marc Coppey is a professor at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris and leads masterclasses all over the world. What’s more, Marc Coppey lends his expertise in the arts and is the Artistic Director of the Musicales de Colmar chamber music festival as well as the Musical Director of the Zagrebacki solisti (Zagreb Soloists). In 2014, he was named the Officer des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture.

Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach is undoubtedly one of the most important figures in music history. His incredible creative power, technical mastery, and intellect have made a lasting impression not only on classical music but also on many different modern music genres we know today.

Born in 1685 in Eisenach, Germany, Bach was a member of a very well-known family of musicians. At 18-years-old, he began working in Arnstadt where he accompanied hymns at church. His professional career as a musician would follow in Weimar, where he resided from 1708 to 1717. Here, Bach would deepen his theoretical study of composition and write most of his organ works. Moreover, he composed preludes and fugues that would be part of his collection The Well-Tempered Clavier. After building a considerable reputation in Weimar, Bach moved to Köthen to take a new role as Chapel Master. Writing less religious songs and putting more of a focus on chamber music, his compositions from this time would bring Baroque instrumental music to its pinnacle.

From 1723 until his death in 1750, Bach worked in Leipzig. First, as Thomaskantor at the Thomasschule and later as a private tutor and director of the Collegium Musicum. During this time, Bach worked on creating a repertoire of cantatas for church and revised many of his previous compositions. From 1726 onward, his keyboard works were published. His death in 1750 came to mark the end of the Baroque period and the beginning of Classicism. For many years after his passing, Johann Sebastian Bach’s works were buried with him until they resurfaced many years later and celebrated for their musical ingenuity.

We have found 3 contents about Bach, Cello Suite nr. 3 / nr. 5

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