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Fried Miriam, Beethoven, Sonata No.4

Sequence published on 12/2/21
Composer : Ludwig van Beethoven
Year of composition : 1800
Artistic period : 19th century
Musical category : Sonata
Academy : Academy October 24 to 31, 2021
Master(s) : Miriam Fried
Student : Alcide Menetrier
Instrument(s) played :

"listening is partially about anticipating what the other person is going to do." Miriam Fried

About the Violon class of Ludwig van Beethoven's work on the Sonata_No.4 op.23

Master class de Violon, Ludwig van Beethoven | Sonate_No.4

"Miriam Fried begins by saying something that may sound obvious to the student, but perhaps was not taken into account while playing this Ludvig Van Beethoven Sonata, No. 4, for violin and piano: “The violin and piano sonata is a piece that has three parts. The violin part, the right hand of the piano, and the left hand of the piano. The relationship between these three parts is forever changing. You could be playing the main line and both hands of the piano could be accompanying you. Or, the right hand on piano could be playing the main line, with the left hand of the piano and you accompanying. You could have a dialog with the right hand of the piano. You could have a dialog with the left hand of the piano. You can join together, you know, and the possibilities are not endless. There's no such a thing, but there are many. And what happens in an interesting and good sonata, which this one certainly is, is that it is constantly switching. And so you roll. It's not the same all the time. So, the sound automatically has to be switching, and your attention has to be switching as well.""
After saying this, the master explains that the violin must, occasionally, emulate the articulations that the piano performs. To get as close as possible when, for example, the violin and the left or right hand of the piano are fulfilling the role of accompanying the melody .
"

"On the other hand, Miriam Fried is interested in highlighting the importance of dynamics in Ludvig van Beethoven, as he “uses dynamics extensively, and he uses it for humor or surprise, and he uses it for dramatic effect;  he uses it for a variety of reasons.""
Another warning made by the master is that this is a highly energetic movement, but the student has a tendency to always round down endings, and the level of energy is constantly sagging: “you have to think about what kind of an ending it is.""
Therefore, with these three aspects of the sonata as axes, Fried and the student work hard on the details of this piece by Ludvig van Beethoven, and on technical aspects of the violin. They focus on intonation, bowings, rythim, color, articulation, expression, etc.
Miriam Fried gives us a phrase to keep in mind, useful for any instrumentalist, and also applicable to any type of repertoire: ""listening is partially about anticipating what the other person is going to do.""
"

What we learn in this Violon Master class

-The violin and piano sonata is a piece that has three parts. As a violin part, the right hand of the piano and the left hand of the piano, and the relationship between these three parts is forever changing it roles.
-The violin must change it sound constantly
-Ludvig van Beethoven uses dynamics extensively, and he uses it for humor and he uses it for surprise and he uses it for dramatic effect and he uses it for a variety of reasons
-Listening is partially about anticipating what the other person is going to do.
-This movement depends on a strong, rhythmic character.
-Importance of thinking ahead
-There is a new theme at the end of the development

About Ludwig van Beethoven work

"Ludvig van Beethoven wrote his first violin sonatas, a set of three (Op. 12) between 1797-98. Six more appeared by early 1803, making a fairly compressed time span for a medium in which Ludvig van Beethoven only wrote one more, which appeared in 1812. All but the last one were written before the composer was 32 years of age. Yet all of them, to varying degrees, show Beethoven straining at the reins that tied him to the genteel world of eighteenth-century classicism in his early years. There is much that is unusual about this sonata. It is one of just two in a minor key (the seventh in C minor is the other). The relentless first movement is in 6/8 metre, unusual for an opening movement of a sonata, as is the tempo marking of presto. Still another unorthodox point to note is the introduction of a new theme (in F major) within the development section, as the master remarks, and still another one (in A minor) at the juncture of the development and recapitulation. The playful second movement is neither a slow movement nor a scherzo, but combines aspects of both and supports three full themes. The rondo finale returns to the driving momentum of the opening movement, its urgent main theme, always initiated by the piano, returning frequently and unvaried while in between statements of this theme are a wealth of episodes contrasting in mood, texture, key, dynamic level, and register. "
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