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Fried Miriam, Mozart, Concerto No.5 in A major

Sequence published on 12/2/21
Composer : Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Year of composition : 1775
Artistic period : Classique
Musical category : Concerto
Academy : Academy October 24 to 31, 2021
Master(s) : Miriam Fried
Student : Anatol Janos Toth
Instrument(s) played :

"there are people who stand on their toes and there are people who bend her knees and there are people who do all kinds of funny things... All of those things are getting in the way of putting the energy into the arm, not the music into the arm, because the only tool that is useful in expressing anything is your right arm." Miriam Fried

About the Violon class of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's work on the Concerto_No.5_in_A_major K.219

Master class de Violon, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart | Concerto_No.5_en_La_majeur

"After listening to the student play the first movement of this Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart concerto, Miriam Fried congratulates the student for having composed the cadenza. Beyond this, she makes several suggestions on how to improve it: “there is a flaw in the cadenza, because if we can't tell that the end is coming, there's a problem there. It's either a problem with the timing, or a problem with the actual ending.""
Later, when talking about the first movement of the concert, Miriam Fried praises how the student plays the first two notes, as she feels them as an invitation for the orchestra to join him.
"

"Later, the master points out that “when you start something, you have to set up the costume from beginning to end at the beginning,"" which is very interesting to think about the development of certain sentences. “So the whole thing is one long sentence. You want to make sure that the trajectory goes all the way there. That doesn't mean that you can't breathe. On the contrary, you have to breathe.""
There is a particularity that Fried points out, and it is the face that the student makes when he plays: he seems angry, but he doesn't sound angry at all. “Part of being in the content is visual...I think that if you're playing and your faces are not coordinated, it's a problem.""
Beyond this, Miriam Fried also indicates that what worries her most are the signs of tension on his face, taking into account the following: “There are people who stand on their toes and there are people who bend their knees and there are people who do all kinds of funny things, you grimace. All of those things are getting in the way of putting their energy into the arm, not the music into the arm, because the only tool that is useful for expressing anything is your right arm.""
During the rest of the class, they work in detail on various characteristics of this particular concert, but without losing some qualities of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's music: typical classical music patterns, harmony, dunamics, bowings, etc.
Near the end of class, Fried shares an unmissable reflection, useful for any interpreter: “The piece is the piece and it's never going to change, but you are going to change it. So your relationship to the piece will change with time and with further reflection. Every time you look, you will see different things, not better or worse, just different…"" Without a doubt, this is a class not to be missed for all instrumentalists.
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What we learn in this Violon Master class

-The function of the cadenza is to be a cadenza and not to development section.
-When the interpreter starts something, the trajectory from beginning to end must be set up.
-The importance of breathing, even in the middle of a sentence
-The introduction isn´t harmonically complicated
-The only tool that is useful in expressing anything is the right arm
-These pieces have a tremendous amount of fun in them

About Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart work

"During a concentrated period of composition in the last half of 1775 in Salzburg, Mozart wrote the last four of his five violin concertos, completing the fifth in December of that year. Although Mozart, as a performer, was chiefly associated with the piano, he was also an accomplished violinist. He probably had himself in mind as soloist when he wrote the concertos for his court orchestra in Salzburg in 1775. The work has several strikingly original ideas that are not found in his earlier concertos. For one, the work begins with an Allegro orchestral introduction, but then the violin enters with an Adagio of only six bars before resuming the Allegro. It's a beautiful and unexpected touch. "
Thematically speaking, the opening is surprisingly unassertive, with the orchestral violins striding out lightly over a quivering accompaniment, but without anything that strikes the listener as a theme. The tempo marking, incidentally, is one that Mozart seems to have been almost the only composer to use: the Italian word Aperto can be translated variously as ‘open’, ‘bold’, ‘clear’ or ‘frank’.
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