String Quartet No. 52 in E♭ major, Op. 64, No. 6, 2nd and 3rd movement

String Quartet No. 52 in E♭ major, Op. 64, No. 6, 2nd and 3rd movement

String Quartet No. 52 in E♭ major, Op. 64, No. 6, 2nd and 3rd movement

Joseph Haydn

Clive Greensmith's masterclass

Produced by the Saline royale Academy English Subtitles are available in English Music sheet annotated by  Clive  Greensmith  is available 38 min. Chamber music

In this masterclass, Professor Clive Greensmith works with Quatuor Magenta on capturing the spirit of the second and third movements of Haydn’s sixth string quartet, op. 64.

Produced by the Saline royale Academy

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The masterclass

About this masterclass

In this masterclass, Professor Clive Greensmith works with Quatuor Magenta on capturing the spirit of the second and third movements of Haydn’s sixth string quartet, op. 64. In the second movement, Greensmith works with the group to master the subtlety and nuance in the musical expression. He helps them determine how the articulation and dynamic markings should be played to match the character of the music and offers advice on bowings. He also demonstrates where the sound can be warmer and where it should be more intimate and encourages the group to pace the transitions between the different characters and moods to heighten the expressive effect. He encourages everyone to listen and react to the harmony. In the third movement, Greensmith helps the group find a lighter quality of sound and articulation and have a more effective interplay between the various parts without losing the clear sense of tempo.  

What we learn in this masterclass

  1. Making small adjustments in color from the bass line upward. 

  2. Choosing the most advantageous bowings. 

  3. Interpreting articulation and dynamic markings. 

  4. Bringing out the different characters and pacing their evolution. 

  5. Displaying excited dialogue without losing the group pulse. 

String Quartet No. 52 in E-flat major, Op. 64, No. 6 by Joseph Haydn

Over the course of his career, Joseph Haydn composed over sixty string quartets, solidifying the genre’s importance in classical music. He composed the op. 64 string quartets, a set of six, in 1790. They are the second set of Haydn quartets dedicated to Johann Tost, a violinist employed in the Esterhazy orchestra that Haydn led. The two had a complicated friendship, though Haydn clearly admired Tost’s musicianship, Tost also secretly sold Haydn’s music for his own profit. The String Quartet in E-flat Major is the sixth and final quartet in the opus. The first movement, Allegretto, is elegant with refined lyricism. Haydn plays with the audience’s expectations by first introducing the music of the recapitulation in the wrong key and later varying some of the material. The second movement, Andante, is expressive and melodic, giving each instrument an opportunity to shine. The third movement, Menuetto: Allegretto, conjures a rustic dance; it deviates from a typical Classical minuet with its uneven phrasing, glissandi, and dissonance. The last movement, Finale: Presto, drives the piece to an exciting conclusion full of unexpected pauses, dynamic contrast, and wit.  

  • Composer: Haydn
  • Piece:String Quartet No. 52 in E♭ major, Op. 64, No. 6, 2nd and 3rd movement
  • Professor: Clive Greensmith
  • Student:Ida Derbesse, Fiona Robson, Boris Blanco, Claire Pass-Lanneau
  • Instruments: Chamber music
  • Date:10 February 2022
  • Producer: Produced by the Saline royale Academy
  • Duration:38 min.
  • Spoken language:English
  • Subtitle languages: English

Sheet music

Aim for excellence! You can improve your skills with expert advice. Download the annotated sheet music of this chamber music masterclass. Please note that this piece has been annotated in accordance to Clive Greensmith’s feedback and comments.

Sheet music string quartet no. 52 in e♭ major, op. 64, no. 6, 2nd and 3rd movement

Clive Greensmith

Clive  Greensmith

Professor of cello and Chamber Music at the Colburn school in Los Angeles.

From 1999 until its final season in 2013, Clive Greensmith was a member of the world-renowned Tokyo String Quartet, giving over one hundred performances each year in the most prestigious international venues, including New York’s Carnegie Hall, Sydney Opera House, London’s South Bank, Paris Chatelet, Berlin Philharmonie, Vienna Musikverein, and Suntory Hall in Tokyo. He has collaborated with international artists such as Andras Schiff, Pinchas Zukerman, Leon Fleisher, Lynn Harrell, Dmitry Sitkovetsky, Alicia de Larrocha, and Emanuel Ax.

Mr. Greensmith has given guest performances at prominent festivals worldwide. In North America he has performed at the Aspen Music Festival, Marlboro Music Festival, [email protected], La Jolla SummerFest, Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, Cleveland Chamber Fest, and the Ravinia Festival. He is a regular guest of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and will undertake a national tour with Paul Huang, Wu Han, and Matthew Lipman in 2020. Internationally he has appeared at the Salzburg Festival in Austria, Edinburgh Festival in Scotland, Pacific Music Festival in Japan and the Hong Kong Arts Festival. As a soloist, Clive Greensmith has performed with the London Symphony Orchestra, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Seoul Philharmonic, and the RAI Orchestra of Rome among others.

Deeply committed to the mentoring and development of young musicians, Clive has enjoyed a long and distinguished teaching career. In addition to his fifteen-year residency with the Tokyo String Quartet at Yale University, Mr. Greensmith has served as a faculty member at the Yehudi Menuhin School and Royal Northern College of Music in England, the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and the Manhattan School of Music. In 2013, following the final concerts of the Tokyo String Quartet, Mr. Greensmith joined the faculty at the Colburn School, where he teaches cello and coaches chamber music for the Conservatory of Music and the Music Academy. Students of Mr. Greensmith have gone on to secure major positions in orchestras throughout the world and have won a number of prestigious awards.

Haydn

Joseph  Haydn

Born in Austria in 1732, Joseph Haydn is widely regarded, along with Mozart and Beethoven, as a bonafide representative of Viennese classicism. He was raised in a musical family with a family of music lovers. At eight-years-old, he was recruited to serve as a choirboy at the Stephansdom in Vienna, Austria. Here, the young musician rehearsed and sang in performances of the most prominent classical music of the time. The experience would fundamentally shape his musical intellect and future.

Joseph Haydn eventually landed a job as a Kapellmeister (Music Director) where he composed his first symphonies and divertimentos. In 1761, his career would continue to flourish after gaining new employment with Prince Paul Anton of Esterházy, and later his brother Prince Nikolaus of Esterházy. Fortunately for the composer, he had the privilege to work with one of the best European orchestras of the time, for which he wrote most of his works. By the 1780s, Haydn’s works were gaining even more popularity and recognition. At times, he was occasionally compared to Mozart.
Prince Nikolaus died in 1790, and his successor, Anton, decided to dissolve the court orchestra led by Haydn. After this, he took up residence in Vienna, and then took the opportunity to make several trips to London, where his music was celebrated by the public.

The composer spent the last years of his life back in Vienna, where he continued to enjoy international recognition until the day of his passing at the age of 77, on May 31, 1809.  In spite of his death, Joseph Haydn continued to be regarded as one of the most prolific and important composers of the Classical era. A common characteristic of his music is the evolution of larger structures out of simple and short musical motifs. His works are key to the development of the sonata form, as well as towards the establishment of symphonies. Overall, Joseph Haydn produced an astonishing volume of music including 108 symphonies, 68 string quartets, 32 divertimenti, 126 trios for Barton, viola, and cello; 29 trios for piano, violin, and cello; 21 trios for two violins and cello; 47 piano sonatas; 14 masses, 20 operas; 2 cello concerti; and 6 oratorios.

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